Arch Contemporary Ballet Premieres A New Ballet using American Sign Language and Poem by Luis Pons


Arch Contemporary Ballet Sheena Annalise x Hues of Memory x Photo by Luis Pons x Dancer Katelyn Somers (3)

By Annie Yang

Arch Contemporary Ballet, in its mission to launch ballet and music to an inclusive 21st century audience, performs a world premiere by Artistic Director Sheena Annalise, presented by the Davenport Theatre354 W 45th St., New York, NY, with four performances Tuesday, May 30th  – Thursday, June 1st at 8:00 pm.

As a rising pioneer for ballet and music, Annalise’s choreography unveils unconventional lines of a dancer’s body in the world premiere ballet, ‘Hues of Memory’. American Sign Language is seamlessly integrated into the movement of two pas de deuxs, three-dimensionally revealing the poetic debut of world renowned photographer, Luis Pons. The bi-lingual interpretation of dance and ASL transports the audience to lush landscapes galvanized by romantic memory. Award winning composer Matthew AC Cohen sets the temperature of the work with a euphoric guitar and violin score performed by Arch Sound Ensemble, and displayed visually with synced lighting technology to the vibrations of the instruments. The theatre space is encapsulated with a greenery maze, setting the backdrop for this madly passionate work and an extension of the photo story series created by Annalise and Pons leading up to the performance.

“Arch Contemporary Ballet (ACB) challenges the past and launches into the future with new pointe work, new music, and new ideas about the potential of ballet,” remarks Annalise. “I’ve drawn inspiration about communicating our memories through different language forms and was inspired by ASL. Pons’s secret stashes of poems were the perfect backdrop for my vision. We continue to portray themes relevant to today, and create work to resonate with new audiences. We want ballet to be and continue to be relevant to the entire community.” Pons adds, “Poetry explains without having to explain, the depth and great heights of the human condition. Annalise’s work embodies how I would visually see my words into movement which made it a perfect fit – the innovation of integrating other art forms translated to this whirlwind of artistry around my poetic story.”

There will be an autism friendly modified performance on Wednesday, May 31st at 6:00 pm as part of ACB’s Arch for Autism Initiative.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

Tuesday, May 30th 8:00 pm
Wednesday, May 31st 6:00 pm (Autism Friendly performance)
Wednesday, May 31st 8:00 pm
Thursday, June 1st 8:00 pm
Running time 30 minutes

Advanced general admission tickets are $25, VIP tickets are $35.
Tickets can be purchased online at www.archballet.com.

DANCERS

Katelyn Somers, Andy Fernandez, Tori Hey, Henry Max McCall.

DIRECTIONS In New York

The Davenport Theatre is located at 354 W 45th Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenue in Manhattan and is accessible by Subway A,C,E at 42 St Port Authority Bus Terminal and 1,2,3,N,Q,R,7,S at Times Sq 42 St.

Arch Contemporary Ballet Sheena Annalise x Hues of Memory x Photo by Luis Pons x Dancer Katelyn Somers (8)

Arch Contemporary Ballet’s Katelyn Somers. Photo by Luis Pons.

ABOUT ARCH CONTEMPORARY BALLET

Founded in 2013, New York City’s Arch Contemporary Ballet was established with a bold spirit and innovative vision to create an artistic process that enhances the connection between ballet and music. All of ACB’s works are choreographed without music. Commissioned composers then create an original music score for each repertoire program. In addition to her innovative way of joining movement and music, Artistic Director and choreographer, Sheena Annalise, challenges classicism with a cutting-edge approach to partnering, pairing women on pointe together as partners. ACB has performed across the country including the Paramount Theatre in Boston, Tempe Center for the Arts in Tempe, AZ, Marlene Boll Theatre in Detroit, New York City’s Sheen Center, and more. Learn more at www.ArchBallet.com.

SHEENA ANNALISE, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Artistic Director and choreographer, Sheena Annalise, at age 14, was honored to work with Wayne McGregor | Random Dance in “Equator Project”, nurturing her choreographic talent. She quickly found a distinct voice by creating innovative body lines and exploring her fascination with the connection between movement and music. In her early work she began to play with creating her own tempos, accents, and pauses in her ballets without the limitations of existing music. Looking to accentuate her silent yet rhythmic choreography, she developed her artistic process of commissioning artists to create music specifically to each repertoire program. Annalise spent 2012 mentoring with the Mark Morris Dance Group, when she then founded Arch Contemporary Ballet the following year. Through ACB she has received residencies and space grants throughout NYC and has been named a “Prodigy” by The Women’s Project.

ARCH FOR AUTISM

Arch for Autism is an initiative for families and friends with children or adults who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder or other sensitivity issues to come together and enjoy the benefits of dance and music. Our goal is to make ballet and music accessible to all by including Autism Friendly performances during our performance season. Adjustments to the production include reduction of obscure lighting, shorter running time, and reduction of any sudden sounds. Plus, there will be areas in the lobby for quiet time or activities staffed with autism specialists for those who need to leave their seats during the performance.

MATTHEW A.C. COHEN

Matthew A.C. Cohen has composed and performed around the globe and is a Remi Platinum Award winner for the short film”@Social #Connection”.  He attended Hofstra University, where he got a B.S. in Music Theory/Composition, with special interests in Film Scoring, Jazz Improvisation and arranging, and orchestration, and went on to get an MFA in Scoring for Media from Columbia College Chicago. He writes for network television shows, including “Reign” and “Vikings”, studio films including “Brick Mansions”, “The Funhouse Massacre”, and “Christmas Land”, and triple A video game titles including “Dragon Age: Inquisition”. He is a versatile and inventive musician and composer.

LUIS PONS
Luis Pons is a New York based world renowned dance photographer whose images are described as eternal, exquisite, and breathtakingly memorable. His photography envisions the pursuit of beauty, symmetry, color and contrasts and is noted for capturing fleeting moments in the human experience. The defining moments where all the energies in the human heart, body and spirit fuse together at 1/500th of a second, are captured eternally by his work. His motivation for photography is to remind himself of the potential in all of us to be beautiful, serene and at peace, and he shares this reminder to the world through his photographs. His work can be seen in publications across the world, such as Buzzfeed,  HuffPost Arts & Culture Feature, Elle, Epoch Times, Capezio’s world campaign, to name a few and he has captured the most distinguished ballet dancers from ballet companies throughout the world including New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, San Francisco Ballet, Arch Contemporary Ballet, and more.

Exclusive Photostory:

Hues of Memory Ballet Poem |’Memory’ by LUIS PONS | Choreography by Sheena Annalise

I have only seen you in these three years like sunlight through a white veil.

Ethereal and diffused, your silhouette like a curved black river through which time had frozen my heartbeat.

In the wind you sway gently, out of reach…
If any man has ever embraced memory, I have…
If any man has ever loved memory, I have…

I stood outside that great door to the ark that housed all our memories.
My broken fingernails like little steps embedded in your heart as you float away with everything that was mine.

This cleansing rain, who is it for?
Swept out to sea.
Unfathomable ocean roar
In the depths I swallow salt and remember your taste…
I remain stained with memory.

In your crucible of truth my hope died.
Left with vague pictures in my mind that I was loved by something grand, that I walked with her in the summer, somewhere green under a blue sky.

A vision of cathedral ceilings filled with golden stars.
A dead end road where a river appeared and kisses under a high moon.

This shell with a heartbeat wakes, walks and sleeps with memory.
So that any hand that touches feels cold and any words that might be said in love are ignored.

My heart beats wildly for you as If to implore you to hear that it has found the answer to the question it never asked.  I held your hand to the thundering of my heart. And you knew in that moment I was alive for you and only you.

My love for you dies in blinding hues of lilacs, reds and blues…

Like bones that have passed through great fires and glow in bright gold and white before turning to dust…
You tried to wake me from this sleep but I fell through too many layers of your silk.
Unlocked too many doors into the paradise that is you
You will never find me to push me out.

In your gardens, I am the lowly dandelion that you walk past to smell your roses.

In your forests, I am the moss that faces north on the old oaks that you dance under.

On your shores, I am the white foam at your feet….

Upcoming Events

May 30 – Jun 1 Spring Season II : World Premiere
May 31st – Autism Friendly Performance
June 1 Cocktails & Conversation for Patrons
Aug 7 – 13 Summer Ballet Intensive at NY City Center
Aug 7 – 13 Summer Composer’s Intensive at NY City Center
Aug 12 – Autism Friendly Performance
Aug 11 – 13 Summer Performance Season at Sheen Center
More information at: www.ArchBallet.com

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Fourth Annual ‘The Benefit’ Offers Up World-Class Music and Dance to Aid Hemophilia Foundation


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Carolina Ballet’s Marcelo Martinez and Lara O’Brien in Robert Weiss’ “Meditation from Täis.” Photo by Ira Graham.

By Steve Sucato

As humans we pride ourselves in turning negatives into positives. Following the proverbial phrase “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade,” we make lakes of the stuff in an effort to ease suffering and find cures for the countless ills life throws at us. So when former BalletMet star Jimmy Orrante’s son Isaac was born with hemophilia ─ a condition in which the ability of the blood to clot is severely reduced ─ Orrante began formulating how he could use his art to help others make lemonade out the lemons life dealt them.

In 2013, he and fellow former BalletMet dancer Attila Bongar organized The Benefit (formerly Dancing for the Cure), a charity event that featured music and dance performances from top flight dancers and musicians from the Columbus area and across the United States.

“The first year we did The Benefit it was to fight cancer and benefitted Nationwide Children’s Hospital of Columbus,” says Orrante. “Me being a part of the hemophilia family and knowing the people in that community, it made more sense for us to link up with The Central Ohio Chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.”

Now in its fourth year the all-volunteer event ─ which annually raises over $25,000 for the Hemophilia Foundation ─ will be even bigger and better. The event, Sunday, May 21, will be held for the first time at The Riffe Center’s newly renamed Davidson Theatre (formerly Capitol Theatre) offering attendees a more theatrical experience.

One of the premiere dance events in the region, this year’s production features dancers and choreographers from Miami City Ballet, Cincinnati Ballet, Milwaukee Ballet, Rochester City Ballet, BalletMet, Columbus Dance Theatre and others, along with live music by Camarata (a multi-piece orchestra made up of musicians from the Columbus Symphony Orchestra and led by CSO principal cellist Luis Biava), Columbus ambient alternative band The Wind and the Sea, and North Carolina bluesman th’ Bullfrog Willard McGhee. In addition, following the performance there will be a meet and greet with the performers that includes food and a silent auction.

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From 2016’s ‘The Benefit’: BalletMet’s Adrienne Benz and Carolina Ballet’s Marcelo Martinez in Jimmy Orrante’s “Imperfections.” Photo by Ira Graham.

The 90-minute program will open with Milwaukee Ballet leading artists Patrick Howell and Nicole Teague-Howell in the Act 2 pas de deux from the ballet Swan Lake with choreography by Milwaukee Ballet artistic director Michael Pink. After a musical selection from baritone singer Robert Kerr, Miami City Ballet soloist Lauren Fadeley and BalletMet’s Jarrett Reimers will perform the first of two works by Orrante on the program; a brand new pas de deux danced to an excerpt from Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor. Says Orrante of the pas de deux, it will be a reaction to the music and to the relationship Fadeley and Reimers develop dancing together.

In “A Caretaker’s Vow” (Excerpt) a solo by dancer/choreographer Marcus Jarrell Willis, the former Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater dancer explores his uncertainty about his future after leaving Ailey and how his friends encouraged and lifted him up. Set to music by British soul singer-songwriter Laura Mvula, the solo, says Willis, “takes you into my innermost thoughts.”

Next, COSI Science Center chief scientist Paul Sutter narrates “Voyager,” a new work in three stylistically diverse movement sections by three different choreographers inspired by and titled after music selections contained in NASA’s  messages from earth Golden Record included on Voyager 1 and 2’s interstellar missions.

The work opens with Orrante’s second piece on the program, a contemporary ballet for 6-women set to Blind Willie Johnson’s song “Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground” sung live by McGhee. “Voyager’s” second part is a new solo by kathak dancer/choreographer Mansee Singhi danced to “Jaat Kahan Ho,” a traditional Indian song sung by Surshri Kesar Bai Kerkar that Singhi says is “related to Lord Krishna’s tales.”

Concluding the work is a new ballet for 12-dancers by Columbus Dance Theatre’s Christian Broomhall set to Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F.”  Says Broomhall, my piece is “wholly inspired by the images and feelings that the music evoked within me. It’s very quirky and whimsical.”

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From 2016’s ‘The Benefit’: BalletMet’s Caitlin Valentine-Ellis atop dancers in Atilla Bongar’s “Forced March: Second Eclogue.” Photo by Ira Graham.

Following a performance of Edvard Grieg’s “Holberg Suite, Op. 40,” performed by Camarata, will be the first of two ballets by Bongar. Yet to be titled, the ballet, set to Alexander Scriabin’s “Fantasie in B minor, Op. 28,” is a trio for Fadeley, BalletMet’s Michael Sayre and BalletMet Dance Academy student Isabelle LaPierre. Says Bongar, the ballet takes inspiration from Jacqueline Kennedy and her emotional state after husband, President John F. Kennedy died. “I saw a touching image of her and her daughter standing in front of JFK’s coffin and wondered what was going on inside her beneath her composed manner,” says Bongar.

Cincinnati Ballet soloist James Cunningham returns to The Benefit with his new ballet “Mordent.” Set to an excerpt from Beethoven’s “Piano Trio in C minor, Op.1 No.3” played live, the neo-classical ballet for two men and one woman says Cunningham, “connects heavily to the musicality of the trio.”

After a piano solo by BalletMet music director Tyrone Boyle, the program’s second-to-last offering comes from choreographer Kristopher Estes-Brown. Danced to live music by The Wind and the Sea, the new contemporary ballet for 6-dancers entitled “Somewhere, Something,” says Estes-Brown, is about “distance, time and human connection.”

Rounding out the program will be Bongar’s pas de deux “Spartacus,” set to Aram Khachaturian’s music from the ballet of the same name and will be danced by BalletMet’s Jessica Brown and Romel Frometa.

One of the easiest and best choices in helping make a difference in the lives of those with hemophilia, their families, and to help find a cure, The Benefit, is a win-win for anyone who enjoys world-class arts entertainment and making lemonade out of life’s lemons.

The fourth annual The Benefit takes place 5 p.m., Sunday, May 21, The Riffe Center’s Jo Ann Davidson Theatre, 77 S. High Street, Columbus, OH. Tickets: Adult – $30, VIP Priority Seating – $55, Student/Child – $15. (614) 902-3965, (614) 469-0939 or https://www1.ticketmaster.com/event/0500527BD2F4CC36#efeat4212

Steve Sucato is a former dancer turned arts writer/critic. He is Chairman Emeritus of the Dance Critics Association and Associate Editor of ExploreDance.com.

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Antaeus Dance Gifts Fans with One Last Gem in Joint Production with Travesty Dance Group


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Travesty Dance Group in “we all had flowers.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

Cleveland Public Theatre 2017 DanceWorks Series
Antaeus Dance & Travesty Dance Group – Taking the Fall
Cleveland Public Theatre – James Levin Theatre
May 4-6, 2017

Reviewed by Steve Sucato

For area dance fans and the Northeast Ohio dance community the opening weekend of Cleveland Public Theatre’s DanceWorks series is always a cause for excitement. But tempering that excitement this past weekend was the knowledge that it would be the last time longtime fixtures on the DanceWorks series and in the local dance community, Joan Meggitt’s Antaeus Dance would be seen.  Founded in 2000, the company took its final bows in Taking the Fall, a joint production with like-minded movers Travesty Dance Group (TDG) at CPT’s James Levin Theatre.

Taking the Fall’s final showing this past Saturday, May 6, proved a showcase of the choreographic aesthetics of each of the company’s respective directors, Meggitt, and TDG’s Kimberly Karpanty, both faculty members in the School of Theatre and Dance at Kent State University.

The program, whose overarching theme “pays homage to those who keep us safe, demand our honesty and serve as models for integrity and right action,” says Karpanty, began with two works by her and performed by TDG.

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Travesty Dance Group in “we all had flowers.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

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Travesty Dance Group in “we all had flowers.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

In “we all had flowers” (2016), five women stood along a diagonal line with their hands shielding their faces.  Like a calculated game of peek-a-boo, the women took turns sliding one hand slowly down from over an eye and then back into place again. The dancers then one at a time engaged in little snippets of movement that took out from their place in line and back in again.

Set to an excerpt from Julia Wolfe’s 2015 Pulitzer Prize-winning oratorio for choir and chamber ensemble “Anthracite Fields,” the moody, post-modern-styled work, mixed spurts of little hops, kicks and runs with hand and arm gestures and body positioning that at times suggested the blooming of flowers.

Next came, Karpanty’s trio “irreverence” (2016) that stylistically could have been mistaken for another section of “we all had flowers.” Danced to music by Dutch classical pianist and composer Jeroen van Veen, the work, apart from a more aggressive tone, used variations on movements seen in “we all had flowers.” In it, a dancer again shielded her face with her hands, only this time with splayed fingers to reveal her intense stare underneath.

(c) Copyright Dana Rogers Photography

Shannon Sefcik and Ashley Lain in Kimberly Karpanty’s “irreverence.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

Quiet gestures such as one dancer rapidly rubbing together the two middle fingers of one hand to draw another dancer’s attention were juxtaposed with several dancers’ loud slapping of hands on thighs. More a work revealing emotionality than any particular narrative, “irreverence,” ended powerfully with one dancer suddenly dropping to the floor in a heap as the other two turned their backs to her and to the audience.

The first of two works by Antaeus Dance, the premiere of Meggitt’s “UpShift” was a brief and lively solo created for longtime company member Heather Koniz Young as a parting gift to her.

Heather Young, UpShift, photo by Brad Petot

Antaeus Dance’s Heather Koniz Young in Joan Meggitt’s “UpShift.” Photo by Brad Petot.

Set to an original percussive score by Antaeus’ de facto resident composer, associate professor of music at Cleveland State University, Greg D’Alessio, Koniz Young was solid executing Meggitt’s stiff darting arm movements and Paul Taylor-like torso-twisting dance moves.  The upbeat solo was a tasty appetizer for Antaeus’ group work to come.

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A scene from “alter idem,” a dance film by Kimberly Karpanty (Director of Photography) and Joan Meggitt (Choreographer/Performer).

The Ohio premiere of Meggitt and Karpanty’s dance on film short, alter idem (second self) was another bite size morsel of goodness. Shot on location in rural Suffield, Ohio with music by D’Alessio played beautifully by violinist Sarah Blick, the 8-minute film featured Meggitt traversing an old wooden structure such as a barn or large chicken coop.  In the film we see her from many angles appearing and disappearing from sight, holding onto support posts, seated in a chair running through gestural hand movements and eerily staring off into the distance. In the film’s closing frames Meggitt is seen standing still, back to us, in a crop field as if she, and we, are looking down at her like an out-of-body experience.

After solo excerpts of Karpanty performed of her new work “Precipice,” the program concluded with its two finest offerings beginning with TDG’s “the tongue of the wise,” choreographed by Karpanty.

Set to music by Bang on a Can All-Stars along with excerpts from a sermon by Pastor Jim Cymbala of The Brooklyn Tabernacle recited live by Chuck Richie, the work pitted dancers Stephanie Harris and Tanya Mucci against one another as the embodiment of the wise man and the fool.

(c) Copyright Dana Rogers Photography

(L to R) Travesty Dance Group’s Tanya Mucci and Stephanie Harris in Kimberly Karpanty’s “the tongue of the wise.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

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(L to R) Travesty Dance Group’s Stephanie Harris and Chuck Richie in Kimberly Karpanty’s “the tongue of the wise.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

During the cleverly-crafted work Richie, moving as an actor among the dancers, spoke of the differences between the fool and the wise man’s reactions to uncomfortable situations as the two dancers gave visual imagery to what Richie was saying, often aggressively tussling with one another.

Ultimately, a chastising of how one person’s thoughts spoken with malice can hurt another, Richie offered up this bit of wisdom, “Endurance is what God gives you to get through situations. Patience is what God gives you to get through people.”

In the conversation as being Meggitt’s magnum opus, the final work on the program, “Mercy” (2016), encapsulated those qualities that have come to define her work for Antaeus Dance over the past 16-years. Wonderfully crafted with a mix of quiet dignity, grace, and beauty, “Mercy” revisited a recurring theme in Meggitt’s works, the interplay between the individual and the collective.

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Antaeus Dance in Joan Meggitt’s “Mercy.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

(c) Copyright Dana Rogers Photography

Antaeus Dance’s Desmond L. Davis and Melissa Knestaut Ajayi in Joan Meggitt’s “Mercy.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

(c) Copyright Dana Rogers Photography

(L to R) Antaeus Dance’s Melissa Knestaut Ajayi and Shannon Sefcik in Joan Meggitt’s “Mercy.” Photo by Dana Rogers Photography.

In it, Antaeus’ full complement of 6-dancers including Meggitt, moved through deliberate and heartfelt choreography that bubbled up feelings between the dancers (and audience) of caring, hopefulness, melancholy and longing. Dancing to another of D’Alessio’s original scores, the veteran unit of dancers never looked better in Meggitt’s signature movement language. They flowed through interactions with each other that were tender and full of purpose.  In a nod to several past Antaeus works, the diminutive Desmond L. Davis at one point was carried offstage cradled in the arms of fellow dancer Melissa Knestaut Ajayi.

In her last performance with the company she founded, Meggitt captivated with her usual precision and determination. Pausing at times during the work to look back reflectively at the other dancers, one got the sense she was also wishing them farewell and thanking them for the years they spent together as a troupe.

A fitting end to Taking the Fall, “Mercy,” a culmination of all the Antaeus works that came before it, shone as a final gem in Antaeus Dance’s legacy.

Cleveland Public Theatre’s 2017 DanceWorks series continues 7:00 p.m., every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, through June 3 at CPT’s newly renovated James Levin Theatre, 6415 Detroit Ave., Cleveland. Tickets are $12/Thursdays and $30/Friday & Saturday. For more information and tickets call (216) 631.2727 x501 or visit cptonline.org.

 

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