DANCECleveland’s Virtual Dance Festival a Soul-Nourishing Stand-In for Live Dance


Vertigo Dance Company in Vertigo 20. Photo courtesy of Vertigo Dance Company.

Reviewed by Steve Sucato

Another outcome of the global pandemic, DANCECleveland’s Dance On! Virtual Dance Festival 2020 that began Saturday, July 25 and ran for a week, replaced its planned annual in-person American Dance Festival in Cleveland (ADF in CLE). The online event treated virtual audiences to four exclusive pre-recorded dance performance videos along with virtual artist chats and a variety of differently styled dance classes.

In its usual highly thought out and expertly detailed manner of doing things, DANCECleveland, for the four performance videos being reviewed here, created a full-blown audience playbill for Dance On! – something unheard of for most virtual productions released so far. Add to that, outgoing executive director Pam Young impressively landed interviews with the choreographers/directors of each or the dance companies/works being presented that preceded each of those recorded works as background information for audiences on the artists and each work.

And what a line-up was presented: French contemporary dance duo Company WANG RAMIREZ’s 2011 masterwork Monchichi; Chicago’s Lucky Plush Productions’ Punk Yankees; Ohio’s Dayton Contemporary Dance Company in Abby Zbikowski’s Indestructible and Crystal Michelle & Sheri ‘Sparkle’ Williams’ Altar-ing, and Israel’s Vertigo Dance Company in Vertigo 20 and Birth of the Phoenix filmed in Jerusalem. Local audiences may recall DANCECleveland presented Lucky Plush Productions in 2013 and Vertigo Dance Company just last year.

Company Wang Ramirez in “Monchichi.” Photo by Nika Kramer.

COMPANY WANG RAMIREZ – MONCHICHI

The first evening-length work produced by Frenchman and former hip-hop B-boy, Sébastien Ramirez and ballet-trained Honji Wang, a German-born dancer of Korean descent as Company WANG RAMIREZ, Monchichi, here recorded in 2015 at the American Dance Festival (ADF) in Durham, North Carolina, was a cutting-edge work that I described in a 2016 review of it in Columbus, Ohio, as “combining an abstraction of hip hop dance with other dance styles and martial arts movement that could very well represent the first salvo in the next trend in contemporary dance.”  

Performed to music composed by Everdayz (Ila Koutchoukov) along with selections from Carlos Gardel, Alva Noto, Nick Cave and others, the 55-minute work, seemingly inspired by the pair’s real-life work and personal relationship, was infused with atmospheric lighting, humor and a smidge of pathos. It was delivered by the dancers with crisp, smooth, polished and efficient technique and artistry.

Monchichi began quietly with the pair in silhouette on a stage occupied by only them and a leafless tree as a set piece. Wang, costumed in white lingerie, moved first, her arms and legs carving lines in the air and space around her. Ramirez, shirtless, shoeless and in long white pants joined in looking like a hip hop flamenco dancer.

As it progressed, Monchichi played out at times like a mating ritual with each performer strutting their dancer plumage for the other to delight in and take the measure of. The pair revealed their passions, frustrations, fantasies and the fractures in their relationship.

Another unofficial performer in the work was the lighting design of Cyril Mulon that appeared to partner the pair and add further aesthetic beauty with its rapid transitions from light to dark and measured interjections of color into an otherwise monochrome world.

Company Wang Ramirez in “Monchichi.” Photo by Nika Kramer.

In one such scene where darkness starkly gave way to white light, the pair executed an onstage wardrobe change with Wang donning a red dress, silver pumps and a blonde wig, and Ramirez, a tailored men’s suit. A sensual and playful fantasy tango dance between the pair ensued but gradually devolved into shame and discomfort for Wang. Another memorable moment was a humorous vignette in which Ramirez acted as if he had thrown out his back after lifting Wang with her misguidedly aggressively patting and rubbing his back making his pain worse.

In the end, what made Monchichi such a captivating dance work was its sophisticated stagecraft in the relationship between Ramirez and Wang and the work’s blending of precision movement with a street dance physicality.

Lucky Plush Productions’ Julia Rhoads in Punk Yankees. Photo by Karen Wade.

LUCKY PLUSH PRODUCTIONS – PUNK YANKEES

Often the best way to address a problem is through humor. That approach was used to comedic brilliance by choreographer Julia Rhoads in Lucky Plush Productions’ 2009 dance theater piece Punk Yankees to call attention to the rampant piracy of the artistic and intellectual property of choreographers and dance artists.  No one exemplified this type of piracy more than Lucky Plush Productions’ main inspiration for the work, the music videos of Beyoncé in which she and her team plagiarized the choreography of Bob Fosse and Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker.

Punk Yankees itself uses the credited dance moves and choreography of others to make its point; doing so in a way that makes you smile ear-to-ear rather than cringing in disgust in them claiming it as their own.

The work begins with a mock post-performance chat by the Rhoads and the dancers with the audience. The spoof chat was not only funny with the dancers answering questions supposedly asked by audience members but were never heard by anyone, but was a clever way to set up to the rest of the work and what it was about. The chat then gave way to the first of Punk Yankees recognizable recreations of others’ choreography, Ohad Naharin’s popular Minus 16 with the dancers seated in chairs in a semi-circle and tossing their bodies backward one after the other.  

Lucky Plush Productions in Punk Yankees. Photo by Dan Merlo.

Some of the works most memorable moments were a send-up of British songstress Kate Bush’s ethereal mime dancing in version one of her music video for 1978’s “Wuthering Heights” (a second video for the song had her frolicking in the woods), and the company in a spoof of 1970’s TV series The Brady Bunch’s show opening in which the dancers projected their faces into the famous stacked grid of squares along with images of Mike (Mr. Brady) and Marsha still occupying two of the squares.

Lucky Plush Productions in Punk Yankees. Photo courtesy of Lucky Plush Productions.
Lucky Plush Productions in Punk Yankees. Photo courtesy of Lucky Plush Productions.

By work’s end the company had sampled movement from dancemakers José Limón, Stephen Petronio, Larry Keigwin, Tere O’Connor, Alvin Ailey and others — all the while driving home the message of plagiarism-bad, making fun of plagiarizing dance, laugh-out-loud funny.

Dayton Contemporary Dance Company in Abby Zbikowski’s Indestructible. Photo by @geekwithalens

DAYTON CONTEMPORARY DANCE COMPANY – INDESTRUCTIBLE AND ALTAR-ING

A work commissioned by the American Dance Festival, Abby Zbikowski’s Indestructible, like Company WANG RAMIREZ’s Monchichi puts forward another unique hybrid dance style. Zbikowski utilizes African and Afro-diasporic forms and the physicality of sports and acts of manual labor to create hers. The result is a regimented form of aerobic contemporary dance that rivals the intensity of extreme exercise programs like Insanity and P90X.

Indestructible was danced to a soundtrack of Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (DCDC) dancers’ sneaker squeaks panting, grunting and the barking out movement commands like “hut hut” and “switch” along with music by American experimental hip hop band Death Grips that was used for transitions between the work’s sections.

Simply put, DCDC’s dancers killed it in the 15-minute stamina destroying work that had them moving through a barrage of foot-stomps, runs and hops about the stage, and spins to the ground. With Indestructible, Zbikowski showed she is a choreographic force to be reckoned with and one to keep an eye on.

Sheri ‘Sparkle’ Williams

Next, the final dance work in American treasure Sheri ‘Sparkle’ Williams’ 48-year career with DCDC, Altar-ing showcased the ageless one’s incredible artistry and skill. The uplifting and spiritual solo co-choreographed by her and Crystal Michelle was danced to music by Smokie Norful and saw Williams costumed in angelic white dancing with her signature ease, speed and attack in choreography that celebrated with smiling enthusiasm Williams’ dancing and her dance career that brought joy and beauty to countless individuals.

Vertigo Dance Company in Vertigo 20. Photo courtesy of Vertigo Dance Company.

VERTIGO DANCE COMPANY – VERTIGO 20 AND BIRTH OF THE PHOENIX IN JERUSALEM

Created in 2012 in celebration of Vertigo Dance Company’s 20th anniversary, Noa Wertheim’s Vertigo 20 opened on a cold, concrete-looking set of walls that framed the stage on three sides. Vertigo’s dancers sat atop shelves that protruded from the walls with one dancer obscured by four white balloons.  

French café music began as two female dancers with Eiffel Tower-shaped hairdos moved slowly across the stage walking on tiptoes and then rolling to the stage floor. Like many of Wertheim’s dance works, her contemporary choreographic movement for the dancers was mostly abstract but precise, stylized and aesthetically pleasing. And while each of her past works featured this same movement language, each brought to it its own mood and emotional impact. Vertigo 20 was no different and was jam-packed with the lush choreography Wertheim and company are known for.  

In one tender duet section, a male and female dancer pushed and pulled at each other and rocked back and forth on flat feet in an embrace like some lullaby of lovers. The pair then gave way to a quartet of women in a slow hip-gyrating waltz across the stage continuing Vertigo 20‘s fluid and languid vision of a sophisticated dance work for sophisticated dance artists who made it sing throughout.

Set to equally lush music by Vertigo’s music manager Ran Bagno, Vertigo 20 switched visual and musical moods throughout but never strayed from its achingly beautiful dance movement. The work’s final scene found Vertigo’s dancers sharing the stage with a forest of single white balloons tethered by weights to the stage floor. The dancers moved about them as they had done from the outset of Vertigo 20, in a spellbinding waltz of allure and meaning.

Vertigo Dance Company in Birth of the Phoenix. Photo courtesy of Vertigo Dance Company.

Rounding out Vertigo’s offerings was a documentary-style film of Wertheim’s 2004 work Birth of the Phoenix filmed in Jerusalem during the pandemic. The eco-dance work shot under an open geodesic bamboo dome and narrated by Wertheim, relates humanity’s destruction of the planet and now the COVID-19 crisis with the rise of the Phoenix bird from Greek mythology. Offering up hope that humanity and the planet will rise again.

Steve Sucato is a former dancer turned arts writer/critic. He is Chairman Emeritus of the Dance Critics Association and Associate Editor of ExploreDance.com.

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New Look Chamber Dance Project Takes to the Virtual Stage for its Annual Summer Season Production


Luz San Miguel and Davit Hovhannisyan in Diane Coburn Bruning’s “Berceuse”. Photo by Rachel Malehorn.

By Steve Sucato

The familiar quote, “If the mountain will not come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain,” takes on new meaning for Washington, DC-based Chamber Dance Project’s annual summer performance series, New Works. “Because of the pandemic” — a phrase now firmly rooted in the global lexicon — the company had to cancel its in-theater performances this summer in favor of a virtual experience for audiences. New Works 2020 (& beyond), 7 p.m. EST, July 31 and September 24, not only brings CDP’s audiences free performances into in their homes, but in making the filmed dance works being streamed, the dancers did not per usual all gather in D.C., rather they remained in their home cities with the means to make the dance films they were a part of coming to them.  

“When this all hit [the pandemic], we instituted a no whining policy,” says CDP founding artistic director/choreographer Diane Coburn Bruning. “I said we are going to look to a beyond this and in the meantime we are going to be very creative.”  

Another unfortunate outcome of the pandemic’s effects has been the loss of a core tenet of CDP’s productions, the use of live music. Because of limitations in online technology, there was not a way to snyc-up the company’s quartet of musicians playing live separately from various locations. So the decision was made to go with recordings.

“We tried, but the time lag [over the Internet] is deadly,” says Coburn Bruning.

New Works 2020 (& beyond) is made up of two different programs. The first, July 31, consists of a red-carpet pre-show hosted by CDP dancer Julia Erickson with interviews of the dancers (several making their CDP debut) and Coburn Bruning. Three filmed dance works will follow including reprises of two Coburn Bruning favorites.

Luz San Miguel and Davit Hovhannisyan in Diane Coburn Bruning’s “Berceuse”. Photo by and pictured, Rachel Malehorn.

A signature work of Coburn Bruning’s, “Berceuse” makes its return in film form. Created in the 1990’s, the 6 ½ minute pas de deux performed by Milwaukee Ballet’s Luz San Miguel and Davit Hovhannisyan and shot by guest videographer Rachel Malehorn at the Milwaukee Art Museum, “Berceuse” takes its inspiration from the Hellenistic sculpture of The Winged Victory (Nike) of Samothrace at Paris’ Louvre Museum. Coburn Bruning says the pas de deux takes on a sculptural feel in her choreography and in the way the dancers move.

Originally created in 2006 on former CDP dancer Victor Quijada, now artistic director/choreographer of Montreal-based RUBBERBANDance Group, the second of Coburn Bruning’s ballets on the program, “Sarabande”, is set to music by Benjamin Britten from his Simple Symphony. It was filmed outdoors in Van Nuys, California by guest videographer Aaron Cota near the Sepulveda Dam and performed by CDP’s Christian Denice. Denice says the 8-minute solo is about memories and a reflection on a life lived.

“I only used the original version from 15-years ago as a reference,” says Denice. “We [he and Coburn Bruning] found the physicality and emotional states within what I brought to the work.”

Company newcomer Cooper Verona, regularly of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, makes his CDP choreographic debut with a filmed version of his pas de deux “In the Silence”, danced to Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s “Psalom”.

Created some 6-years ago, Verona says the 6-minute pas de deux took its inspiration from feelings he had at the time about mortality after receiving the news that his father had been diagnosed with cancer.

The pas de deux, performed by fellow CDP newcomers, husband and wife team of Austin and Grace-Anne Powers from Columbus, Ohio’s BalletMet, was filmed in the woods of Shale Hollow Park in Lewis Center, Ohio by guest videographer Jennifer Zmuda.

Verona says the woodland location of the shoot matched his internal vision of the work’s setting being a serene locale and lended to his wanting to capture in his choreography “a feeling of weightlessness.”

Austin and Grace-Anne Powers in Cooper Verona’s “In the Silence”. Photo by Jennifer Zmuda.

Weightlessness was not the feeling Austin and Grace-Anne says they felt in the set-up to filming. Where they would normally be called upon to be just performers in a normal CDP production, because of the nature of New Works 2020 (& beyond), “it is impossible to be only a dancer at right now,” says Austin. “We are having to be the production department, stagehands and more.”

The morning of filming the Powers backpacked some 50lbs of gear including 54 foam tiles and several large canvas drop cloths up hills and across a ravine to the film site where they assembled the lot to be their dance floor for the shoot. Similarly, Zmuda hauled some 40lbs of camera equipment and says she had her own issues with the terrain.

“It was challenging to walk around while filming,” says Zmuda. “My focus was in the camera and I was using my peripherals as much as possible to see where I was stepping, but I did fumble over rocks and unsteady ground as well as got scratched up by branches.” 

One benefit of being sheltered at home because of the pandemic for the Powers is that they have gotten to dance with and partner each other more now than ever.

Austin and Grace-Anne Powers in Cooper Verona’s “In the Silence”. Photo by Jennifer Zmuda.

“This summer we have been getting more opportunities to discover how we move together,” says Grace-Anne. “Austin and I have different tendencies in the way approach things and I think our partnering now has become more intuitive.”  

While the Powers and Zmuda’s shoot involved some heavy lifting, the California sun’s heat was the main contention in filming “Sarabande,” says Denice. The beach-sand-hot dirt floor he danced on burned his feet and the clouds of dust he kicked up while performing the solo quickly ruined his white costume he says.

In addition to the elements and other considerations, the dancers also had to become their own camera crews for a few other projects that are a part of New Works 2020 (& beyond). One is is Denice’s new work-in-progress piece “Dwellings” which will be previewed during the July 31 production.

The piece, recorded over Zoom to music by Philip Glass and others says Denice, “is a celebration of these sanctuary spaces that we have created for ourselves in our homes during the pandemic.”

Screen shot of Christian Denice working with CDP dancers on “Dwellings”.

Denice says he wanted to capture the emotions of what it is like for the dancers not to be in the familiar womb-like confines of the studio and having to create that kind of space in their own environments.  

“Later when we get to come out of those spaces and back into the studio I want to see how different it is for the dancers,” says Denice. “Maybe we appreciate it more, maybe it’s different and challenging to do so.  

CDP’s dancers were also responsible for filming themselves for the September 24 premiere of Coburn Bruning’s new dance film A Single Light.  Each of the dancers involved in the film were sent by the company video monitors and gopro sports action cameras to film themselves dancing in their own environments to new choreography created for them by Coburn Bruning. The film’s original soundtrack is by James Bigbee Garver and the same creative team behind Coburn Bruning’s 2019 work “Prufrock”.

“The film is just vignettes of different spaces and different people,” describes Coburn Bruning. “I used a modified rondo motif with views of spaces in the dancers’ homes such as corners, stairs and seating areas that reoccur throughout.”

Prior to shooting the dancers were given camera workshops from multi Emmy Award-winning filmmaker David Hamlin. Coburn Bruning herself has a filmmaking background having received fellowships to study at Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute as part of her list of accomplishments.

In addition to A Single Light, CDP’s September virtual performance will include the first public screening of a filmed version from Coburn Bruning’s powerful 7-minute “Exit Wounds” (2015) performed by the original cast of Luis Torres and Andile Ndlovu to music by Phillip Glass.

Get FREE tickets to New Works 2020 (& beyond) at: https://chamberdance.org/beyond/

Steve Sucato is a former dancer turned arts writer/critic. He is Chairman Emeritus of the Dance Critics Association and Associate Editor of ExploreDance.com.

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New summer dance program ‘nextSPACE’ one of a few recent developments for GroundWorks DanceTheater


Nicole Hennington. Photo by Downie Photography.

By Steve Sucato (with Jimmy Schlemmer)

Amid uncertainty over the global pandemic and the ways forward for arts organizations, Cleveland’s GroundWorks DanceTheater is making the best of the uncertainty by doing what dance companies do best; getting creative.

Their new summer dance program nextSPACE, running now – August 22 is an interconnected series of activities and performances in both live and virtual spaces around Cleveland and Akron.

Each week, the company invites the Northeast Ohio community to connect, react, and experience GroundWorks in a variety of ways. nextSPACE will feature a virtual happy hour, artist talks, outdoor and online movement classes for dancers and non-dancers as well as pop-up, drive-in-style performances.

nextSPACE has been carefully planned and crafted to ensure the safety of all participants in strict adherence with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local health authority guidelines.

See below for a full rundown of nextSPACE programming.

nextSPACE isn’t the only new development with the company. With the end of last season, three of GroundWorks five dancers have moved on from the company. Michael Arellano joined Seattle contemporary dance company Whim W’Him and Alexis Britford and Spencer Dennis have left for other pursuits.

Auditions began in March for three new dancers but those were put on hold due to the pandemic. So for now GroundWorks’ activities and performing, including nextSPACE, will be done by Annie Morgan and Nicole Hennington.

The nextSPACE concept is about finding different and creative ways to continue to engage and connect with community,” says GroundWorks Executive Artistic Director, David Shimotakahara. “So what space is that? It could be online or somebody’s porch, who knows.”

The nextSPACE concept is something Shimotakahara sees the company continuing to do with for the foreseeable future. “It’s a tricky equation,” he says, balancing what GroundWorks’ does with the health and safety concerns of all involved.

Annie Morgan. Photo by Downie Photography.

nextSPACE PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE

To register for any of these programs and the most up-to-date information, visit: groundworksdance.org/nextspace.

JOURNEY: PUBLIC ART SHARE

Journey with GroundWorks across Northeast Ohio as they explore creative spaces in our community through different pieces of Public Art. Each week, GroundWorks will share pictures their dancers and staff have taken of their favorite murals and other pieces from both the Cleveland and Akron areas while highlighting information about the artists and their work. Join them for this and more through the company’s new nextSPACE Summer Series. This part of the program will be ongoing throughout. GroundWorks is encouraging people to participate and share their reactions to their favorite murals around the region.

CONNECT: OUTDOOR AND VIRTUAL CLASSES

Creative Process for Pre-Professional Dancers – Virtual * Pre-Registration Required
July 21, 2020 at 12 p.m.
Online Class (Zoom Required)


Creative Process is for pre-professional/professional dancers 16+ curious about composition, improvisation, inspiration, and creativity. Class will begin with a guided improvisation warm-up structured through Brain Dance, which was strategically created for non-dancers to center their brains and bodies for physical activity. This will then lead into compositional tasks used to create GroundWorks most recent dance works. Participants will then work in partners to explore different movement impulses and reactions through interaction, before working as a group to create several pieces to share with one another. Class will conclude with a group discussion and reflection following a brief return to individual body and breath. The majority of class will take place seated, though there will be opportunities for full bodied movement in the warm-up and cool down.

Creative Movement for the Family * Pre-Registration Required
July 28, 2020 at 12 p.m.
Online Class


Creative Movement for the Family is perfect for families with active bodies looking for a new group activity – no dance experience required! Bring your household around a screen and come join the GroundWorks team for 45 minutes of activities to keep you and your little ones moving together. Class
will be designed with grades K-5 in mind, but students of any age and their
parents/grandparents/caregivers are encouraged to join us as well! Participants can expect to move together, play together, and create together with the support of the GroundWorks instructors.

Creative Process for Pre-Professional Dancers – Outdoor * Pre-Registration Required
Date TBD, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Lake View Cemetery; 12316 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106


Creative Process is for pre-professional/professional dancers 16+ curious about composition, improvisation, inspiration, and creativity. Class will begin with a guided improvisation warm-up structured through Brain Dance, which was strategically created for non-dancers to center their brains and bodies for physical activity. This will then lead into compositional tasks used to create GroundWorks most recent dance works. Participants will then work in partners to explore different movement impulses and reactions through interaction, before working as a group to create several pieces to share with one another. Class will conclude with a group discussion and reflection following a brief return to individual body and breath. Class will take place outdoors on grass in a partially shaded area. Masks are required to be worn for the entirety of class (60 minutes) by all participants, please notify GroundWorks’ staff of any concerns regarding masks prior to registration. Participants will be expected to comply with spatial distancing requirements on site as well. There will be no access to restrooms or a water fountain at the class location, please prepare accordingly.

Creative Movement in Akron – Outdoor * Pre-Registration Required
August 11, 2020 at 3 p.m.
Cascade Park; 57 W North St, Akron, OH 44308


Creative Process is for pre-professional/professional dancers 16+ curious about composition, improvisation, inspiration, and creativity. Class will begin with a guided improvisation warm-up structured through Brain Dance, which was strategically created for non-dancers to center their brains and bodies for physical activity. This will then lead into compositional tasks used to create GroundWorks most recent dance works. Dancers will then work in partners to explore different movement impulses and reactions through interaction, before working as a group to create several pieces to share with one another. Class will conclude with a group discussion and reflection following a brief return to individual body and breath. The majority of class will take place seated, though there will be opportunities for full bodied movement in the warm-up and cool down.

Creative Movement in Cleveland – Outdoor * Pre-Registration Required
August 18, 2020 at 3 p.m.
Dunham Tavern Museuem; 6709 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44103


Creative Process is for pre-professional/professional dancers 16+ curious about composition, improvisation, inspiration, and creativity. Class will begin with a guided improvisation warm-up structured through Brain Dance, which was strategically created for non-dancers to center their brains and bodies for physical activity. This will then lead into compositional tasks used to create GroundWorks most recent dance works. Dancers will then work in partners to explore different movement impulses and reactions through interaction, before working as a group to create several pieces to share with one another. Class will conclude with a group discussion and reflection following a brief return to individual body and breath. The majority of class will take place seated, though there will be opportunities for full bodied movement in the warm-up and cool down.

David Shimotakahara. Courtesy of GroundWorks DanceTheater.

REACT: ARTIST TALKS
Happy Hour Artist Talk with David Shimotakahara
July 24, 2020 at 5 p.m.

Online *Registration Required to Join the Zoom Call

Join GroundWorks for our virtual Happy Hour Artist Talks. They encourage you to make your favorite drink (alcoholic or non-alcoholic) and join them as David Shimotakahara, GroundWorks’ Executive Artistic
Director, talks about the making of his newest work “Jigsaw, “ and how GroundWorks is remaining creatively connected and during the pandemic. Company Education and Community Engagement Coordinator, Rebecca Burcher, will serve as our moderator and guide the conversation. As always, there will be time towards the end for open discussion and questions from viewers and participants. Each talk will be streamed on GroundWorks’ Facebook and YouTube pages. For direct access to the conversation, pre-register to join the zoom call. Registration will be open a week before the talk.

Virtual Open Rehearsal of “Jigsaw”
July 24, 2020 at 5 p.m.

Online

GroundWorks invites you into an open rehearsal of David Shimotakahara’s newest dance work “Jigsaw.” The company will be live streaming the rehearsal for the safety of the dancers and audience members. No registration is required for an inside view of GroundWorks’ rehearsal in-progress.

Antonio Brown

Happy Hour Artist Talk with Antonio Brown
August 7, 2020 at 5 p.m.
Online *Registration Required to Join the Zoom Call


Join GroundWorks for their virtual Happy Hour Artist Talks. The company encourage you to make your favorite drink (alcoholic or non-alcoholic) and join them as Antonio Brown, Artistic Director/Founder of Antonio Brown Dance, talks about his work and choreographic process, as well as his new commission for GroundWorks during the pandemic. Education and Community Engagement Coordinator, Rebecca Burcher will serve as moderator and guide the conversation. As always, there will be a time towards the end for open discussion and questions from viewers and participants. Each talk will be streamed on GroundWorks’ Facebook and YouTube pages. For direct access to the conversation, pre-register to join the zoom call. Registration will be open a week before the talk.

EXPERIENCE: POP-UP DRIVE-IN PERFORMANCES

Pop-Up Drive-In Performance in Cleveland *Pre-Registration Required
August 15, 2020 at 8:30 p.m. & 10 p.m.
Rear Agora Parking Lot; Entrance off Prospect Ave.

Pop-Up Drive-In Performance in Akron *Pre-Registration Required
August 22, 2020 at 8:30 p.m. & 10 p.m.
Location TBA


E
xperience GroundWorks DanceTheater with new pop-up, drive-in performances. The performances will take place outside, in selected parking lots, and cars will be circled around the performers. The
performance will feature the world premiere of “Jigsaw” a new duet choreographed by Executive Artistic Director, David Shimotakahara. Come prepared to participate with your headlights! Because of the nature of the performance and the current state of the pandemic, for the safety of our
patrons, dancers, and staff, we will require all audience members to arrive and view the performance in their cars. Due to the limited number of car spaces for each performance Pre-Registration is required and
opens on July 20th. While there is no ticket charge, GroundWorks is asking for a suggested donation of $25 per car, and each car can have multiple people inside.

nextSPACE PARTNERS

• Cascade Park (Akron)
• Downtown Akron Partnership
• Dunham Tavern (Cleveland)
• Geis Property Management (Streetsboro)
• Lake View Cemetery (Cleveland)
• MidTown Cleveland

About GroundWorks DanceTheater

Now in its 22nd season, GroundWorks DanceTheater is dedicated to the development and presentation of new choreography and collaborations. The Northeast Ohio-based company performs new works by Executive Artistic Director, David Shimotakahara, as well as commissioned work by nationally & internationally acclaimed choreographers including Eric Michael Handman, Rosie Herrera, Kate Weare, Robert Moses, Ronen Koresh, Dianne McIntyre, Lynne Taylor-Corbett, Jill Sigman, Gina Gibney, David Parker, Brian Brooks, James Gregg, & many others. GroundWorks is committed to presenting unique opportunities for engaging the community through work-in-progress showings, master classes, and educational outreach to school children, college students, and senior adults.

GroundWorks DanceTheater’s annual programming is made possible with funding from The National Endowment for the Arts, The Ohio Arts Council, Cuyahoga County residents through Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Toby Devan Lewis Philanthropic Fund, GAR Foundation, Peg’s Foundation, The Char & Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, The John P. Murphy Foundation, The Kulas Foundation, Akron Community Foundation, The Demetros Charitable Trust, The Judith Gerson Fund, Sisler McFawn, Individual Contributors & Members of the GroundWorks Board of Directors.

For more information, please visit groundworksdance.org or call 216-751-0088.

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